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If I'm being in formal speaking, do you think it's ok to use word whatever?

I think this word somehow doesn't fit a good conversation especially when talk to the olders. I feel like it gets a bit careless intonation whenever I use it .

I will consider whatever you choose

Would it get the same meaning with

I will consider anything you choose

Because I tend to see this word used in informal conversation (like teen stuff you know...)

Yeah whatever you choose

In my country (culture) we could also use only a word to express the kind of word, but we tend to make it a bit longer to get it formal, something like :

Yes you can choose anything, I will consider every single of them

not just whatever

  • I'm glad you got an answer to your question so quickly, but you may want to wait a little longer before accepting it. This post on meta explains why: meta.ell.stackexchange.com/q/1307 – ColleenV parted ways Mar 29 '16 at 13:21
  • Who or what do you mean by "the olders"? Do you mean people older than me, older people, the elderly, seniors? All of these are more natural and idiomatic than "the olders", which native speakers do not use. – Alan Carmack Mar 29 '16 at 16:47
  • If I'm being honest, Yes, at the time (actually the whole time) I asked questions on this site, I think I want some more "answers" coming since this is about language ("people need more explanations"). I agree I accepted the answers a bit hurry. – Plain_Dude_Sleeping_Alone Apr 1 '16 at 8:39
  • And the olders is actually elderly seniors, my mistake (: – Plain_Dude_Sleeping_Alone Apr 1 '16 at 8:40
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"Whatever" is quite OK to use in a polite conversation, as long as you speak in complete sentences. "I will do whatever you want" is fine. "Whatever" on its own sounds dismissive- you don't think that the person you are talking to deserves a complete sentence.

"Consider" is something that your elders, your boss or your bank manager say: it means "I might accept your suggestion, I might reject it". If you are a respectful junior, you "accept" or "take notice of".

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