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I thought I'd try eating Japanese food today.
I thought I was going to eat Japanese food today.

The second sentence implies that I didn't eat it actually, but how about the first sentence? What happened eventually? Does it imply the same as the second sentence?

"I asked because I thought you would know." -Does it mean that this person actually didn't know? The more I think, the more I get confused. Could you help me?

3

Would has two possible meanings in this context:

  • as the past of 'will', (something expected to happen) expressed from the viewpoint of the past
  • to express a wish

going to expresses something already planned

I thought I would try eating Japanese food today.

As the past of "will", it means that I expected to eat Japanese food. Adding I thought indicates that the plan was frustrated: I did not, and probably will not eat Japanese food today. If not already mentioned, the speaker would normally go on to explain why the plan was frustrated.

As a wish, it means that, earlier today, I decided that it would be nice to eat Japanese food. If the speaker does not go on to describe the meal, the listener will assume that the person has not yet eaten Japanese food, but still has that wish- maybe will do later today. The listener might even regard it as an informal invitation to join the speaker for Japanese food.

I thought I was going to eat Japanese food today.

With something already planned, I thought implies that the plan was frustrated. This means that I decided earlier today, but my plan was frustrated and I have not yet, and probably will not.

With either frustrated plan, the speaker would emphasize the word thought.

1

I thought I'd try eating Japanese food today

This sentence is agnostic with regard to the outcome of trying to eat Japanese food. One might hear someone say this while eating at a Japanese restaurant:

A: "What are you doing here?"

B: "I thought I'd try eating Japanese food today."

But one might also hear this if the attempt failed:

A: "Why are you back so early?"

B: "I thought I'd try eating Japanese food today, but it didn't work out."

You are correct about the second sentence: the implication is clearly that it did not work out, or perhaps that some unforeseen complication has arisen.

I thought I was going to eat Japanese food today (but I did not).

I thought I was going to eat Japanese food today (but you seem to have other plans).

The final sentence seems, at least to me, to carry an implication that the speaker suspects that the other person does not know:

A: "Why did you ask me?"

B: "I asked because I thought you would know" (but I am not sure now).

0

The first sentence could be interpreted two ways: either I decided to try eating Japanese food today, or I was under the impression that eating Japanese food would be an occurrence of the day. The second sentence, while not as pleasant to the ears, is unambiguous: I thought that I would. It can have an implication of not actually happening, but really it just depends on the context. In "I asked because I thought you would know", the speaker does not imply anything about what actually happened; he is simply stating what was passing through his mind at the time of his question.

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