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What term you would use to express the situation that when you send a mobile message it's not directly delivered (for instance, because the receiver's mobile is off or any glitch due to the internet connection)?

  • Lay off message

  • Deferred message

  • Suspended message

May I use all of them in the context of mobile text message?

Is there any difference?

Which one is the most common usage in the EU and the USA?

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    I don't believe I have ever heard any of them. I would sort-of understand the second and third (though I don't know if they have a specific technical meaning or not). The first one is completely unintelligible to me. I'm in the UK – Colin Fine Apr 1 '16 at 10:23
  • I'm a US speaker, and I have the same reaction as @ColinFine. What are you trying to talk about? – StoneyB Apr 1 '16 at 16:31
  • I think my question is clear. What term you would use to express the situation that when you send a mobile message it's not directly delivered (for instance, because the receiver's mobile is off or any glitch due to the internet connection)? – Student Apr 1 '16 at 23:44
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    The message can be referred to as delayed when the problem is with the mobile infrastructure and not the sender, the analogy would be "the mail has been delayed". If you say a message is deferred it would usually mean the sender has delayed it intentionally, but you seem to be asking about something outside of the sender's control causing the delay. One would not say the message is suspended, the delivery system may be suspended which would cause the message to be delayed. until the delivery system is reactivated. – Peter Apr 2 '16 at 0:36
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    Just call it a sent message. – Alan Carmack Apr 2 '16 at 14:47
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Do you mean a text message that will be sent later, rather than immediately?

"Deferred message" would be the best fit, out of your three examples. Deferred means something that will be done later.

"Lay off" is used for employment. For example, when a company does not have enough work for their employees, they "lay off" some employees, which means those employees no longer have work. Sometimes it's permanent, sometimes not.

Of if someone tells someone to "lay off!", they are telling the person to stop (permanently) doing whatever it is they are doing.

"Suspended" gives the idea that something is wrong. For example, if someone's driver's licence is suspended because of bad driving.

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Q: What term you would use to express the situation that when you send a mobile message it's not directly delivered?

A: I'd use offline message(s).

It's probably the most effective, straightforward, and understandable choice, in the messaging context.

I believe that most of the messaging protocol standards would use this word, offline, as well. For example, taken from a specification by the XMPP Council:

XEP-0160: Best Practices for Handling Offline Messages

Abstract: This document specifies best practices to be followed by Jabber/XMPP servers in handling messages sent to recipients who are offline.
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