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I have changed the net connection to a package that/which cost is $15 per month.

Which relative pronoun is proper to use in such scenarios? Can we use whose for abstract or non-living things?

  • Is there a reason you're using this format? The simplest version would be "I have changed the net connection to a package that costs $15 per month." – Catija Apr 4 '16 at 16:11
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    @Catija No, I was just asking that which one would be better in my format – Lewanay da Kainat Apr 4 '16 at 16:14
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It would be "whose". You are saying that the package's cost is $15 per month. That is possessive. "Which" is to refer to a noun previously mentioned, but "whose" is the possessive pronoun. As @Catija mentioned in the comments, though, this would sound better:

I have changed the net connection to a package that [or which] costs $15 per month.

0

"I have changed the net connection to a package which costs $15 per month."

This converts the final clause from the passive to the active, and then uses 'which' correctly, as a way of giving further detail about "the package".

The alternative, "I have changed the net connection to a package whose cost is $15 per month." would be highly unusual. Generally speaking, the possessive "whose" is more often used of people.

This is not exclusively true - e.g. "This is an idea whose time has come" is a common expression. But generally, I would avoid use of the possessive 'whose' when applied to inanimate objects.

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