1

Maybe, that early suggestion went, the familiar notion that any given experiment has one and only one outcome is flawed.

We can say "the saying goes" but to the best of my knowledge, we can't say "the suggestion goes". So, please explain the usage of the word "suggestion" in the above sentence.

The original context:

    Over the years, this substantial gap in understanding has inspired many creative proposals, but the most startling was among the first. Maybe, that early suggestion went, the familiar notion that any given experiment has one and only one outcome is flawed.

1

One general sense of go is follow a course or path, proceed from beginning to end. This sense has a very wide range of literal and figurative uses:

They went from Dover to London.
Watling Street went from Dover to Wroxeter.
Things are going from bad to worse.
Our project is going smoothly.
My reading so far has gone up to the chapter on the 18th century.
How does the song go? (hums)
As the old poem goes, "Love me little, love me long".

So it's acceptable to say that a suggestion goes - it "traverses" or "covers" the stated content.

0

You certainly can use to go in this way, but it's a somewhat informal usage. Dictionary.com definition 46

to go: Informal. to say; declare (usually used in speech)
I asked the clerk for my receipt, and he goes, “You don't need it.”

Many people who think the above example is excessively informal / uneducated will nevertheless accept as the saying goes because they've heard it so often (besides which, as the saying says sounds silly). But it's essentially the same usage.


Additionally, as StoneyB says, to go can also have the sense to follow a course. I don't know what might have been written about OP's particular "suggestion" earlier, but it's possible the usage can also be seen as a shortened version of ...that early suggestion went on to explain, for example.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy