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The definition of upwardly mobile is "moving or able to move to a higher social class". However, this meaning doesn't make sense with word equity, which means "the value of a company, divided into many equal parts owned by the shareholders", or "the value of a property after you have paid any mortgage or other charges relating to it". Because the combination is confusing to me. How could valued thing get a higher social class?

So what does upwardly mobile equity mean?

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2 Answers 2

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Upwardly mobile simply means moving up (mobile -> moving, upwardly -> in an upward direction). When a person is described as upwardly mobile it can refer to social classes, as you say, but you could also use it to literally describe someone who was moving upward.

So upwardly mobile equity means equity that is moving in an upward direction. So the equity is increasing. It's as simple as that :)

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"Equity" in this context, means "a chance." A lottery ticket, if you will.

Upwardly mobile equity would therefore mean, "a chance of upward mobility."

Example: A person will win $1000 if he correctly guesses head or tails on a coin flip (a 50-50 chance). His equity is .50 * $1000 or $500 (50% of $1000). It' not the whole $1000 because there is a 50% chance he won't guess right.

Likewise, a poor person who has a good education and is well spoken has "upwardly mobile equity." S/he may or may not be upwardly mobile but clearly has a chance.

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  • Well, from the dictionary it has the meanings of "the value of a company, divided into many equal parts owned by the shareholders", or "the value of a property after you have paid any mortgage or other charges relating to it", but it does not have the meaning - a chance. So it confuses me with the combination of upwardly mobile.
    – canoe
    Aug 5, 2013 at 2:02
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    I don't agree with this. It simply means that an asset is getting more valuable.
    – BobRodes
    Aug 5, 2013 at 3:47
  • @canoe: See my example. Equity refers to "shares" of a companhy" but can also refer to "shares" of a probability, with "heads" and tails" having an equal share of a coin flip;.
    – Tom Au
    Aug 5, 2013 at 12:59

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