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"In that scenario try to auto-detect the header row. Inform page 2 about the outcome." Is this phrase all right? What would a native English speaker use?

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  • What is the desired meaning? Could you provide the context? As is it doesn't sound natural.
    – user3395
    Apr 13, 2016 at 11:23
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    "Inform _____ about the outcome" is grammatical and sounds reasonable, but I don't understand how you inform a page about something. Usually you would inform a person, or something that acts like one.
    – stangdon
    Apr 13, 2016 at 11:56
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    Idiomatically, the normal preposition in this context is inform him of the outcome. That's about 2150 hits in Google Books, compared to just 4 for inform him about the outcome. That's because informing someone about something implies giving "extended" information about the thing, not just the bare fact of the outcome / result / measurement. Metaphorically "informing" something like a page is fine in your context. Apr 13, 2016 at 13:13

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This sounds like software documentation from the phrases you've mentioned. If this is the case, I think the phrase you came up with it understandable but a little odd. Software terminology would be closer to "Pass the result to page 2".

As stangdon said, you usually inform someone about an outcome, rather than something.

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  • You are correct, it's a comment fragment in source code. Thank you for your help.
    – Dan
    Apr 14, 2016 at 8:02

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