1

Is there any difference in meaning the folloing sentences convey?

How long does it take me to get there?

How long does it take me to reach there?

2

There is no difference in meaning. Just the former is more idiomatic than the latter as "get there" sounds more natural. To get, to arrive and to reach all could be used with "there", however, to get there is the most idiomatic phrase and to arrive there and to reach there are used far less as indicated in the linked Ngram Viewer.

To reach is usually used as a transitive verb with a specific object as a destination as in:

It usually takes 8 hours to reach London flying from New York.

However, to get and to arrive are used intransitively and they require preposition before a destination as in:

It usually takes 8 hours to arrive at (or in) / get to London flying from New York.

The reason to is not used in your example sentence is there is an adverb that doesn't require any preposition after an intransitive verb.

There is no hard and fast rule on which one to use. The best way is to find more example sentences that contain the verbs and get yourself familiarized with their usage.

0

The verb to reach most commonly used in the context of getting to the place designated as the end (as of a race, ride, trip etc.):

We hoped to reach the camp before dark.

Also, reach may mean getting something at the edge of your arm's length. It is often followed by the prepositions for, into and across:

He woke up and reached for the phone.

He reached into his pocket to get his wallet.

He reached across the table for a lighter.

So, asking "How long will it take me/us to get there?" or "How long does it usually take you to get there?" seems to be a much better choice when asking about time duration .

  • 1
    May you emphasize on the difference between get there and reach there . – Gt_R Apr 17 '16 at 13:25

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