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Here's an example from the Murphy's grammar textbook:

"I have to get up early tomorrow. I have a lot to do."

So my question is: shouldn't it be "I WILL HAVE to get up early tomorrow." because of "tomorrow"?

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    You could say that, too. But you don't need to because "tomorrow" already indicates the future, so the "will" is in some sense redundant. (We don't use the present tense for past time this way, but we can use the present tense for future time.) – Peter Shor Apr 15 '16 at 14:50
  • As your example demonstrates, will is not a marker of future tense in English. – snailcar Mar 9 '17 at 21:05
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I would suggest you are probably currently in the condition of having a lot to do tomorrow as the tasks have likely already been allocated. However, saying you "will have a lot to do" implies you aren't already in the condition of having a lot to do tomorrow, which probably isn't the case.

You might say "I have to get up early tomorrow. I will have a lot to do." if were referring to tasks you know will be allocated, but which haven't been allotted just yet.

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