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In my English book, there is a sentence like this:

"Tidal waves are the result of an abrupt shift in the underwater movement"

and another sentence that is quite similar to the first one (in my opinion)

"Tidal waves are the result from an abrupt shift in the underwater movement of the earth."

My teacher said that the second sentence is wrong because of "the result from" using, but I don't find it wrong and my teacher didn't explain me much about this.

4

The first sentence is correct.

Tidal waves are the result of an abrupt shift in the underwater movement

While the second sentence should be

Tidal waves result from an abrupt shift in the underwater movement of the earth.

Things either are a result of something(s) or do they result from something(s).

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When used as a noun, the word result is followed by the preposition "of".

When it's used as a verb, it is followed either by "in" or by "from". The choice between the two depends upon what you are focusing on — the reason for or the consequences of something.

Examples:

Even a slight negligence may result in tragedy (negligence is the reason).

Nothing good will result from quarreling with the boss (nothing good is the consequences).

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