0

I'd appreciate your time and all answers so here is my question and the case I'm curious about.

"The same (wish) GOES to you"

It is also proper to say:

"The same wishes GO to you"

in case we have more than one wish?

I had a discussion with my mate in which he claimed that the verb in the sentence modifies the subject (You) but I'm convinced it actually modifies the noun (Wish).

So what's being modified here, the subject or the noun?

Thanks in advance!

migrated from english.stackexchange.com Apr 20 '16 at 5:04

This question came from our site for linguists, etymologists, and serious English language enthusiasts.

1

I had to think about this, because we don't normally say the whole sentence- we usually say "and the same to you".

Looking at your sentence, wish or wishes is the subject of the sentence and you is the object. The verb matches the number of the subject, so I confirm that your second example is correct.

"The same wishes GO to you"

1

I had a discussion with my mate in which he claimed that the verb in the sentence modifies the subject (You) but I'm convinced it actually modifies the noun (Wish).

Verbs don't modify things, they are modified by adverbs.

Verbs can take complements of several types, such as predicate nominatives, subject complements, objects, and other things and they require a subject unless they are infinitives or gerunds (in which case they work like nouns and still don't modify things). Verbs also need a subject. But the relationship between these things and the verb isn't really "modify" - what modifiers do is answer the question "what kind" (NOT just "what") or "how/how many/how often", not provide required information or "parameters".

The same goes to you

The verb here is go, and go's subject is the same.

Same is a word that can point to a singular or plural noun.

I bought two packs of red candies and gave them to Mary. I gave the same to Michael yesterday. The same are (plural) supposed to go to Johnny.

I bought one pack of red candy and gave it to Mary. I gave the same to Michael yesterday. The same is (plural) supposed to go to Johnny.

I think technically what is happening is the same thing as if you turn an adjective into a noun, similar to the following example.

I found red and blue dishes out everywhere in the robbed house, and all the red were broken.

Notice here we did not say the reds.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy