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This question already has an answer here:

As a general rule, a sentence that begins with noun A and noun B should be followed by a "plural" form of the verb. For example, May and Tom are good students.

However, which verb should be used in the following example?

Example

The diagnosis and management of disease X require/requires an extensive ...

As in the first example, the original sentence can be broken into

May is a good student.

Tom is a good student.

May and Tom are good students.

Following the logic,

The diagnosis of disease X requires .... The management of disease X requires ....

Shouldn't the diagnosis AND management of disease X be followed by require? Or is there any difference between the diagnosis and management of disease X and THE diagnosis and THE management of disease X, in which the subject in the former is considered singular and that in the latter is plural?

marked as duplicate by ColleenV, Nathan Tuggy, shin, Varun Nair, user24743 Apr 21 '16 at 6:00

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • Marking questions as duplicates is, in fact, specifically intended to help with the problem that questions are often hard to search for. No blame is intended and there's no "slack" to cut; it's just a practical way to keep things together. – Nathan Tuggy Apr 22 '16 at 2:40
  • I really dislike some of the "canned" messages SE has for certain actions because they don't reflect the intent behind the action very well. You may want to read blog.stackoverflow.com/2010/11/… - it explains that having several variations of the same question is a good thing. Closing this question as a duplicate is not the same thing as trying to delete it. There are closed as duplicate questions from 3 years ago still on the site. – ColleenV Apr 22 '16 at 3:20
  • Based on my limited experience on other stack exchange forums/groups, I have been under the impression that once a question is marked as a duplicate, they will go into the cyber-dumpster and no longer be searchable. It's all cool but I just never like THAT policy (as for most people who ask questions, it's not because they have too much free time and like to troll. It's because they have a question and couldn't find (know how to find) the answer. – B Chen Apr 22 '16 at 21:25
  • Duplicate questions don't disappear if they have been upvoted or have upvoted answers. This question was closed as a duplicate three years ago and is still around and searchable: ell.stackexchange.com/q/4492. Part of the usefulness of duplicate questions is that they give different ways to find the "master" question and they link a bunch of related but maybe slightly different questions together. The 'master' question doesn't necessarily have to be the 'best' - it's just the place where everything is linked together and where all new answers should get directed. – ColleenV Apr 26 '16 at 21:51
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For OP's specific example, both singular and plural verb forms are fine. It really just depends on whether the speaker thinks of diagnosis and management as two distinct things, or two components of a composite "medical response". Speaking for myself, I would tend to the latter interpretation.

That's why we can say, for example, Fish and chips is a British tradition.

  • So you'd probably choose "the diagnosis and management", not "the diagnosis and the management". Is this assumption correct? – B Chen Apr 20 '16 at 13:59
  • Probably I would, but the long and the short of it is there's no "grammatical rule" saying I can't repeat the article even when I'm treating the combination as syntactically singular. – FumbleFingers Apr 20 '16 at 14:03
  • So is there a general rule? "Fish and chips is a British tradition" is considered ok but I think, say, "Alice and Bob is in Britain" is considered wrong. Why can't I consider "Alice and Bob" as a "single" group of two people, which "is" in Britain? – velut luna Apr 20 '16 at 19:52
  • @Mathaholic: No, there's no hard&fast rule beyond what I said in the answer (but you might find this ELU answer helpful). It's not easy to think of a context where two people's names could reasonably be treated as a single unit for this purpose outside of somewhat contrived contexts like Janet and John is a children's book, or Higgins and O'Sullivan is the snooker final I'm really looking forward to. – FumbleFingers Apr 20 '16 at 23:06

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