3

Which one of the two following sentences is correct?

It's a place which they can call home.

Or

It's a place where they can call home.

I'm asking this question because I recently wrote a paragraph in which I used the word "which" but my teacher changed it to "where" and I was wondering why? Why did she did that?

  • 2
    Technically, neither is necessary. "It's a place they can call home" is perfectly fine. If you really want to use which/where don't forget that "that" is an option, too. – Catija Apr 20 '16 at 17:18
  • 1
    @Catija - I think some might argue that "that" would be a better option. More here. – J.R. Apr 20 '16 at 17:20
  • Ok guys I understand I asked this question because I recently wrote a paragraph in which I used the word "which" and my teacher changed it to "where" and I thought why? Why did she changed it? – Manuel Hernandez Apr 20 '16 at 17:34
  • That context is really important to your question because it helps us understand why you're asking. Please edit that information into your question and consider including similar context in future questions! – Catija Apr 20 '16 at 17:41
  • @AlanCarmack I like "which" better than "where" and "there" "there" doesn't rhyme in my sentence. – Manuel Hernandez Apr 20 '16 at 17:44
9

They mean different things.

It's a place which they can call home.

is the same as

It's a place that they can call home.

It says that they consider the place to be their home.

You can also use

It is a place they can call home

for the same meaning.


On the other hand,

It's a place where they can call home.

means that when they are in the place, then they can call home - e.g. because there is a phone they can use to do it.

1

Relative pronouns that and which can be used interchangeably in most circumstances. When used as object relative pronouns, as in the sentence 1, they are often left out of the sentence altogether. Delete "where" from the second, and it'll be correct too - unless you really meant making phone calls, not calling the place their home.

  • This is true, but it does not answer the question. – Alan Carmack Apr 20 '16 at 17:35
-1

Usually, a place is a where. Which: what one or ones of a group : what particular one or ones — used to indicate what is being shown, pointed to, or mentioned (dictionary)

Some of the information contained in this post requires additional references. Please edit to add citations to reliable sources that support the assertions made here. Unsourced material may be disputed or deleted.

  • Your answer is actually incorrect. I understand how you reason, but it is still incorrect. Please read the accepted answer, for a better explanation. – virolino Apr 16 at 8:52

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