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Association Football (soccer) is played by two teams, each of 11 players, who attempt to get the ball into the opponent's goal, usually by kicking it.

What does "to get the ball into the opponent's goal" mean ?

  • It means kicking the ball past the goal line, therefore scoring a goal. I'm not quite sure what you don't understand, please elaborate. – MorganFR Apr 29 '16 at 12:18
  • This is tricky, because I think this is actually not the phrasal verb it looks like. I assume you understand the word "into" and that is not the problem. "Get" has many definitions, and I think the appropriate one is 5 b: to cause to move. They could kick the ball into the goal, or carry it into the goal, or whatever, but get covers any possible way of doing it. – stangdon Apr 29 '16 at 12:20
  • Note the difference between the phrasal verb and your example. – userr2684291 Apr 29 '16 at 13:24
  • Thank you very much. I appreciate your help. Now I understand what it means – Stanislav Apr 29 '16 at 13:40
  • You're welcome! I am going to promote my comment into an answer, so if you feel that it was helpful, you can accept it. – stangdon Apr 29 '16 at 19:10
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This is a tricky sentence to understand, because I think this "get X into Y" is actually not the phrasal verb it looks like (which would be to get into something).

"Get" has many definitions, and I think the appropriate definition of "get" here is

5 b: to cause to move.

"Into" just means "towards the inside of something"; the ball is going into the goal because it is moving to the inside of the goal from the outside.

So the players are causing the ball to move into the goal. They could kick the ball into the goal, or carry it into the goal, or whatever, but get covers any possible way of doing it.

  • Get can be used like put if the object is far away and might require a third party or a major effort to obtain, i.e. you are expected to cause it to be somewhere more than actually move it yourself. – LawrenceC Jul 29 '16 at 2:25

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