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  1. His father won't be able to leave for Delhi until they have arrived.

  2. His father won't be able to leave for Delhi until they arrive.

Which one is correct?

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Both sound natural. They technically mean something slightly different:

The first sentence would mean that he can't leave until after they arrive.

The second sentence means that he can leave the moment they arrive.

But in practice, both are used interchangeably.

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Not only do they sound natural, bur they are both correct, grammatically. Since you put the question, are you sure now that they are interchangable in the context?

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  • I thought we can use only "present perfect" in until-clause. – starun008 May 2 '16 at 18:56

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