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I'm studying English listening to CNN student news.

http://edition.cnn.com/2016/04/26/studentnews/sn-content-weds/index.html

At 5:54, the audio sounds like "Today current local will be rain" (also the script). However, I think, but not sure, the sentence is grammatically broken. Shouldn't it be something like "Today, current locale will be raining" ?

FYI, The robot speaking the sentence is made in Japan, and that could be the reason why the sentence is grammatically wrong, I guess.

Anyway, I'd like to make sure if I am correct.

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  • I'm not sure if it's a technical glitch or a badly edited script, but I'm pretty sure "Today current local will be rain" is grammatically incorrect.
    – Varun Nair
    May 3, 2016 at 7:11

1 Answer 1

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No, "Today, current local will be rain" is not English. It may be Japlish.

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  • I agree, it must be the word-to-word literal translation to English that's given this sentence no meaning at all.
    – Varun Nair
    May 3, 2016 at 10:53

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