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This question came up in our school test and required the students to translate the sentence from Korean.

The sentence they were looking for was...

What do you think we can do to help her?

However, some students wrote:

What do you think that we can do to help her

and

What do you think we can do for her to help?

They sound correct but what is the rule(if any) the English teacher at the school is curious and I'm at a loss for a specific rule to quote her offhand.

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What do you think we can do to help her?

-- This sounds ok to me, however if I was going to write this, I might break it into two questions What do you think? What can we do to help her?


What do you think that we can do to help her

-- that seems superfluous, but not inherently wrong


What do you think we can do for her to help?

For is generally used to indicate the use of something, or because of something, or for some duration.

To is generally used to indicate a direction of movement, a destination, a relationship between two concepts, or a period of time.

I don't think these work well together in this sentence. Adding for makes it ambiguous. Do you want to help her, or do you want her to help another. By adding for in this way, I then have to wonder, who you want to help.

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