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I am studying the material "A day in the life of Jeff", from eslpod. I came across two sentences which seems not clear to me.

The first one is in episode 8

I'm going to boil some water. To boil means to make the one of very hot.

The second one is in episode 9

I'm glad tomorrow is trash day since we have so much trash from moving over the weekend.

For the first sentence, I'm not sure what grammar it is to use "of" here. I am more comfortable with no "of" here instead. What do you think? Another point is, I guess "the one" here means "water", but is it a good practice to use "the one" to delegate "water" which is uncountable noun?

**Correction: I checked the accompany audio and in first sentence, "one of" should be "water". The script is wrong. I'm sorry for my careless mistake. **

For the second sentence, I guess it is better to replace "from" by "for". I'm not sure if it is a typo or not. I also don't understand the logic to use the "over the weekend", because the context tells that trash day is tomorrow which is Friday. Then why it says "over the weekend" here? I understand this sentence this way,

I'm glad tomorrow is trash day since we have so much trash, produced over weekdays, for disposing of.

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To boil means to make the one of very hot.

makes zero sense. From our comments to one another, we figured out that this is a mistake in the transcript. The transcript should read

To boil means to make the water very hot.

As far as

I'm glad tomorrow is trash day since we have so much trash from moving over the weekend.

This is fine. What don't you understand? From talks about the origin of something or someone.

Here, the origin is moving, which means moving from one house to another house. It means packing everything up and moving to a new place. This can usually produce lot of trash (whether it's boxes, paper, junk...).

Over the weekend means during the weekend just completed. But the further it gets from the past weekend the less I would be inclined to say over the weekend. Nevertheless, it's possible to say it on a Thursday to refer to the previous weekend.

Meanwhile, for can indicate for the purpose of and the following makes little sense:

I'm glad tomorrow is trash day since we have so much trash for the purpose of moving over the weekend.

  • This is the script of an audio material. I'm reading it first and then will listen – Hua May 8 '16 at 9:57
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    Is this the official script, provided by the producer of the EFL material? Or is this someone else's script? In any case, I can still make the guess that someone has misheard water as one of, as the latter is inappropriate here. – Alan Carmack May 8 '16 at 10:01
  • Er, I have to admit that I don't get the script from ELS site directly myself. But the script I get has ESL logo and copyright statement on it. So... I assume it is official. – Hua May 8 '16 at 10:04
  • Hua, what ESL Podcast number is it? – Alan Carmack May 8 '16 at 10:14
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    Oh, Now I guess I know what it means. So this sentence actually says we moved house last weekend, then produced a lot of trash and now we are going to dispose of them tomorrow. This indeed makes sense! – Hua May 8 '16 at 10:28

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