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Jack's mother got angry at Jack because he exchanged her cow for beans.

"And now off with you to bed. Not a sup shall you drink, and not a bit shall you swallow this very night." So Jack went upstairs to his little room in the attic, and sad and sorry he was, to be sure, as much for his mother's sake, as for the loss of his supper.

This content is from "Jack and the beanstalk" in English fairy tales.

I couldn't understand this sentence "as much for his mother's sake, as for the loss of his supper". Could you teach me?

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Jack was sad and sorry for the loss of his supper—that is, he was sad as sorry because he lost his supper.

He was equally (= "as much") sad and sorry for his mother's sake—that is, he was sad and sorry because he had angered and disappointed his mother.

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    Thank you for your helpful answer. Can I rephrase like "Jack was sad and sorry for his mother's sake as much as for the loss of his supper? May 8 '16 at 17:51
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    @YuuichiTam Yes; or "Jack was as sad and sorry for his mother's sake as for the loss of his supper." The storyteller chooses the version you quote in order to make the reason for Jack's sadness an addition or supplement to the assertion that Jack was sad. May 8 '16 at 17:59

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