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I always used e.g. to introduce a non-exhaustive list, as in the following sentence.

He was the school champion of many activities (e.g., chess, badminton, 110m hurdles, and high jump).

Can e.g. be used to introduce a clause?

This can be used by other modules to act accordingly, e.g. field_ui uses it to add operation links to manage fields and displays.

This is what the former CEO's did too, e.g. John Doe did it when he was CEO between 2001 and 2006.

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    Yes, it's used exactly like for example. But eg (like for example) is an adverbial (or adsentential), not a conjunction, so when it introduces an independent clause it should be preceded by a semicolon. I always follow it with a comma, but I handwave that in other folks' writing. Aug 11 '13 at 14:49
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As StoneyB said in his comment:

Yes, it's used exactly like for example. But eg (like for example) is an adverbial (or adsentential), not a conjunction, so when it introduces an independent clause it should be preceded by a semicolon. I always follow it with a comma, but I handwave that in other folks' writing.

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From the book The new well-tempered sentence:

A comma is used after terms such as that is, i.e., e.g., and namely when they are used to introduce a series or an example.

So the information is that "e.g." should be placed between commas.

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  • Other style guides don't mandate a comma, and anyway the question isn't about punctuation but about introducing a clause rather than a noun phrase. Aug 13 '13 at 17:57
  • @Gilles For the first issue, I took it from a good book, so how I would I know else? For the second issue, placing "e.g." between commas wouldn't make sense at the beginning of a paranthesis, so I assume it is meant for this case (also it says "an example") I would update my answer when I get more info. But thanks for nudge
    – Theta30
    Aug 13 '13 at 18:47
  • To add to @Gilles comment: It also only states, that is should be followed by a comma, not necessarily placed between commata. So preceding it with a semicolon and following it with a comma, like StoneyB said, is fine.
    – skymningen
    Sep 6 '13 at 7:23

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