1

At the end of every day we deploy our product with our team members developed features. Each one will get a turn to deploy in daily manner. The person who going to deploy will ask like,

Is there any pending commits for today?, I am going to deploy.

Then each member of the team will answer like,

  1. NO
  2. NOT FOR ME
  3. NOTHING FROM MY SIDE
  4. NOT FROM ME
  5. NOTHING FROM MY END
  6. NOT FROM MY END

As a newbie in my team, I am little bit confused how I should react to this question. Here are my questions,

Does this six mean the same ?

Is this six have different meaning ?

Which one is correct ?

Which one is wrong ?

Any suggestion would be helpful.

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2

They all mean the same, which is "I have no pending commits to provide". In part, your confusion comes from the fact that the question is asked of multiple parties simultaneously, none of whom can immediately answer it.

The question is "are there any pending commits?" - well, I don't know, because I can only speak for myself unless I've already checked with the others. So "no" would technically be wrong unless you knew that no-one else had any commits, although most people would understand it to mean "no, I have no commits" versus "no, no-one has any commits". The other answers then aim to personalise that negative to make it clearer: "no, not from me", "no, I have nothing", etc.

The "my side/my end" constructs are thus simply reflecting that personal perspective, therefore: "speaking for myself, no".

  • Thanks @Prof for your answer. So the point is all mean the same – JG's Spark May 3 '16 at 3:40

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