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Is it correct to say:

You can save images to a different folder than videos, meaning images should be stored in one folder and videos in a different folder.

Or should I say:

You can save images to a different folder other than where you save videos.

What is the correct way to say it simply and shortly?

migrated from english.stackexchange.com May 12 '16 at 12:34

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  • Your first option is fine. Your second one is not. "Different" already means "other". You are saying the same thing twice. Additionally, "other than" is a fixed phrase that does not work here at all. You get a horribly malformed sentence. You want something simple and short. Your first option is simple and short. So why are you now trying to make it complex and longer? P.S. "another than" is not a phrase at all, and you're not even using it. Not sure why did you put it in the title in the first place. – ЯegDwight May 12 '16 at 12:34
  • Oh, and "you can save images to a different folder than videos" does not mean the same thing as "images should be stored in one folder and videos in a different folder". Why don't you just say "images should be stored in one folder and videos in a different folder"? Say that. You used this simple and clear wording to explain the situation to us, now go ahead and use this simple and clear wording to explain it to others. – ЯegDwight May 12 '16 at 12:37

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