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Also, in a novel like this, I would expect to be left guessing at the end as to what was real and what was imaginary, or supernatural.

I am not sure if I understand this sentence properly. My interpretation is as follows: the author says that he does not want the end of the book to reveal whether the facts presented in the story are imaginary or supernatural. But it seems to be very odd. I would await from the (horror) story exactly the opposite (clarification and and reducing the ambiguity) but in this case it would have to "stop guessing" instead of "left guessing". So what does "left guessing" mean in the context?

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I took a look and found an origin quote. From which looks like the previous explanations are right. The author of comment was not satisfied, when the mystery was revealed and he stopped guessing, but it's even difficult to explain for him why he felt that.

Also, in a novel like this, I would expect to be left guessing at the end as to what was real and what was imaginary, or supernatural. This one spelled most of it out. When the mystery was revealed, it rang false to me. I can't explain why without massive spoilers, and I'm not sure I could articulate it anyway.

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Also, in a novel like this, I would expect to remain/still be guessing at the end as to what was real and what was imaginary, or supernatural.

This seems to be directed at the reader, not the author.

The statement includes "I would expect", meaning it is the opinion of the person making this statement regarding what the reader will experience. Whether the reader will prefer this is not stated.

  • So the reader prefer the ambiguity? – bart-leby May 13 '16 at 20:33
  • Please check my edit. – user3169 May 13 '16 at 20:50
  • My confussion stemmed from the fact that this comment concerns a book of fantastic genre. Crossing between supernatural and imaginary should be in my opinion at the end of the fantastic story resolved either in favour of one or another. It seems to me as if the author of this comment did not not want to be satisfied. – bart-leby May 13 '16 at 21:18
  • That's right. You might prefer that every question be resolved at the end of the book, but this critic doesn't. – Colin Fine May 13 '16 at 21:24

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