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There was an insect in my room, and I was trying to get it out (of my room).

There was an insect in my room I was trying get out.

Do both the sentences mean the same thing?

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    Did you mean - "There was an insect in my room I was trying to get out." – Varun Nair May 17 '16 at 9:21
  • Get rid of it, perhaps. – V.V. May 17 '16 at 20:36
  • @VarunKN, yes. The insect was in my room, and I was trying to get it out of there. There was an insect in my room I was trying to get out- does this convey the same meaning as the above sentence? – lekon chekon May 18 '16 at 10:03
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Not exactly.

The first sentence is a compound sentence. First, it states that there was an insect in your room. Then it follows up by saying that you were trying to get it out of your room.

The second sentence is technically missing a word (although in AmE, we tend to leave it out all the time). Grammatically speaking, it should be:

There was an insect in my room that I was trying to get out.

The difference here is that there is only one statement; there was an insect in your room. It clarifies that the insect was one that at one point in time, you were trying to get out of your room.

The first sentence is about what you are doing, the second is saying what you have done. A subtle difference, but a difference nonetheless.

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  • Couldn't have said it better myself. – Tucker Jun 8 '16 at 15:08

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