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I need to know what preposition—other than "among"— I may use with the adjective "commonplace" when it is used thus:

This knowledge should be commonplace with those who have training in law.

This knowledge should be commonplace to those who have training in law.

This knowledge should be commonplace for those who have training in law.

Thank you.

  • Is there some reason you don't want to use "among"? It is definitely the most common and appropriate if you're referring to a group of people. – stangdon May 19 '16 at 12:20
  • Yes, I used it two times in nearby phrases. Using it a third time makes the idea expressed sounds a little robotic. Now, would you please tell me if any of those prepositions work? – asef May 19 '16 at 13:53
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All four prepositions can be used with the adjective 'commonplace'.

Merriam-Webster

with: used to say that two or more people or things are doing something together or are involved in something.

to: used as a function word to indicate addition, attachment, connection, belonging, possession, accompaniment, or response (definition 4)

for: with respect to (definition 7)

That being said, there are some slight connotation differences between the four prepositions. 'Among' and 'with' are neutral sounding, while 'to' and 'for' are more forceful.

'Among' and 'with' would best be used when the statement is mostly true. (i.e. it's okay that some don't know.) 'To' is stronger, placing more emphasis that those who study law should know. 'For' is the strongest, particularly with the "soft" modifier 'should'. A professor may use the preposition 'for' when scolding a class for not learning a concept.

'For' is commonly used when there's a definite number or a statement of fact.

This knowledge should be commonplace for 80% of those who have training in law.

This knowledge is commonplace for those who have training in law.

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