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In writing business letters, when we don't know the name of whom we are writing to which words are better to use?

Can we use "To whom it may concern"?

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Yes, that is fine. However, it is very formal, for example with letters having to do with legal matters. Less formal and more typical is "Dear Sir or Madam:" (note the use of the colon; "To whom it may concern:" also should use one). If you know the title or job position of the individual to whom you are writing, you should use that: "Dear Judge:", "Dear Claims Adjustor:" and so on. Also, if the letter isn't about business, for example you are inviting the Claims Adjustor to a party, you would use a comma: "Dear Claims Adjustor," would be the style in this situation.

0

There is nothing wrong with writing, "To who it may concern", but personally it sounds very unprofessional and incorrect because it concerns a whole lot of people, including you who is writing this letter. SO I recommend that you use "Dear Sir/Madame" and of course remember to use your colon ':'at the end of the salutation

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When you don't know the name of the person in charge of sponsorship, "Dear Friend," is both professional and friendly without being overly familiar. Also "Dear Potential Sponsor," which is a little more direct but sponsors already know you want money so they prefer you to be upfront.

  • 3
    I'm sorry but "Dear Friend" sounds like a very poor choice for a professional document. – Catija May 24 '16 at 23:05
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    Somebody you don't know is by definition not a friend. – nnnnnn May 24 '16 at 23:51
  • These might be suitable greetings for potential sponsors, even though the question doesn't ask about potential sponsors. – Ringo May 25 '16 at 1:58

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