3

1: What is difference between "much more" or "far more"?

2: Is the incorrect sentence, below I mentioned, really wrong?

3: If so, how should I use "much more" or "far more"?

Incorrect: Since her husband began playing violin, Molly has become much more expert in distinguishing a tuned instrument from an out of tune one, a Stradivarius from a student rental.

Correct: Since her husband began playing violin, Molly has become far more expert in distinguishing a tuned instrument from an out of tune one, a Stradivarius from a student rental.

  • 2
    Whoever told you that the example with much is 'Incorrect' was wrong. Both much and far may be used here, and there's no difference in meaning. Far is a touch more literary than much. – StoneyB on hiatus May 23 '16 at 12:20
  • 1
    If it is from the same GRE book that you mentioned before, I advise you to throw it away. – user24743 May 23 '16 at 12:30
  • 1
    Slightly off topic, but if you change the context, much more could actually be wrong. For instance in sentences where you should use many more. Far more could be used in both cases, – Mr Lister May 23 '16 at 12:35
  • @Rathony whatever you said is right. I am a learner of English. I need something to guide me. 90 percent of the book follow strict grammar rules. So leave that – ARYF May 24 '16 at 3:59
  • 1
    Well, I remember you said the book you are reading can't go wrong. The above sentence proves again that it can go wrong. Whoever wrote that book doesn't know what they are talking about. It's up to you. – user24743 May 24 '16 at 4:06
2

I'm going to have to agree with the several folks who have commented, and use an English Language and Usage question that talked about much more, to bolster the common consensus:

Much more being used in this context is no different than far more.

You're also using the correct word with respect to the noun expertise being considered "uncountable" and thus the appropriate word to use being much; were the noun being discussed a countable one (like apples, fingers, cars, etc), the appropriate word would instead be many.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.