1

It is common to have a which clause.

The problem, is it okay or common to have an iterated which clause?

Below is what I am going to write:

Underlying the cusps is an exactly solvable model, which consists of equally spaced levels extending from -∞ to +∞, between which two arbitrary levels are coupled to each other by the same strength.

Is it ok?

5
  • Why would you think it is not OK? – MorganFR May 26 '16 at 10:13
  • @MorganFR Because it is rare. – wdlang May 26 '16 at 10:38
  • 2
    It is not that rare, repetition of words happen a lot, like "which", "that", "for", "of", etc. There is nothing wrong about it. Also consider en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… and en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… – MorganFR May 26 '16 at 10:50
  • Agreed. I think the use of which in your example sentence sounds perfectly natural. I'm not sure I understand what you mean by "Underlying the cusps", but that is a different question. – Paul Pehrson May 26 '16 at 18:58
  • If each which has its referent, use as many as you wish. – P. E. Dant Reinstate Monica Aug 25 '16 at 7:15
1

There is nothing technically wrong with the sentence.

However, it might be helpful to chunk the information more finely and improve readability. Long sentences are common in academic writing and a pain to read.

Underlying the cusps is an exactly solvable model consisting of equally spaced levels extending from -∞ to +∞. Any two arbitrary levels are coupled to each other by the same strength.

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