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what does ''the way in which'' exactly mean or equal to?

You might not call it pacifist necessarily, but a way in which many people, not necessarily following the Iraq War, but that's one example of it, came to see that war is no longer a legitimate part of the political life of a nation. It may be an existential part of it. Weapons of mass destruction could threaten us all.

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You might not call it pacifist necessarily, but a way in which many people, not necessarily following the Iraq War, but that's one example of it, came to see that war is no longer a legitimate part of the political life of a nation. It may be an existential part of it. Weapons of mass destruction could threaten us all.

I think the part in bold can be transformed as "how most people came to see that war."

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This is quite difficult to explain, however i will try my best. By saying "a way in which" the writer is expressing the way someone may see/do something etc, how they experience something. In this case, it would be like saying "You might not call it pacifist necessarily, but the way or how many people came to see that war ..."

Hope this helps

  • thanks but really still unclear for me. what does it equal to in general not in the context. – Abd Alrazak Bostani May 28 '16 at 21:32
  • The way in which is more-so used in 'formal' communication, its 'informal' counter part could simply be "the way" or "that" eg: They way in which I multiply 34 x 12 is... OR: The way I multiply 34 x 12 is... eg: Walking is the way in which I get to school OR: Walking is how I get to school or Walking is the way I get to school – politicallycorrect May 29 '16 at 2:49
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Consider the use of the preposition in in the following:

In what manner was she speaking?
-- She was speaking very rapidly, and she was quite out of breath.

Did the manner in which she was speaking seem normal?
-- No, she seemed alarmed.

which is a proxy word for an earlier noun, to which it relates. If that earlier noun requires a preposition, as is the case with manner, we use the same preposition with the relative which.

We cannot ask:

Manner was she speaking? ungrammatical

We must ask:

In what manner was she speaking?

We could ask:

How was she speaking?

"In what manner" is a circumlocution for "how".

We might use the circumlocution because sometimes how can imply disbelief or incredulity; we are asking for an explanation for something that seems nearly impossible:

If you were wearing a raincoat, how did your shirt get all wet?

With the duct-tape over his mouth, how was the prisoner speaking?
--His tone was very angry.
No, I mean, how was he even able to speak?

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