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This is an Arabic sentence that I have translated into English. It makes more sense in Arabic. I need help on the last part. Thank you.

If A is followed by E, I or U, the A will be incorporated into the/that letter.

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    Can you explain more. What do you mean by "incorporated into thoes letters"? – user33000 Jun 3 '16 at 9:35
  • I think it's called 'blending' in English. When scholars are teaching children how to read: by putting letters together to pronounce words e.g. When you say the word apple the a is incorporated into p to make ap...ple – user35072 Jun 15 '16 at 12:38
  • By "followed by", you mean A comes first and one of the 3 letters you mentioned comes after it? If this is the case, I'd rather say:If the letter A percedes one the letters E,I,or U, it will be incorporated into that letter. But as you don't like "one of the letters" part so let's change it this way: If the letter A percedes one of these letters: E,I,or U, it will be incorporated into that letter. – user33000 Jun 15 '16 at 21:02
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    Now about the word incorporated, I guess you mean the sound of the letters than the letters themselves. So I have some suggestions: 1. Coarticulation: in its general sense refers to a situation in which a conceptually isolated speech sound is influenced by, and becomes more like, a preceding or following speech sound. 2. Elision: or deletion is the omission of one or more sounds (such as a vowel, a consonant, or a whole syllable) in a word or phrase. Sometimes sounds are elided to make a word easier to pronounce. – user33000 Jun 15 '16 at 21:13
  • And 3. Assimiliation: In phonology, assimilation is a common phonological process by which one sound becomes more like a nearby sound. This can occur either within a word or between words. In rapid speech, for example, "handbag" is often pronounced [ˈhæmbæɡ]. – user33000 Jun 15 '16 at 21:14
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the: used before nouns to refer to particular things or people that have already been talked about or are already known or that are in a situation where it is clear what is happening

that: used to refer to something that has been mentioned or was involved earlier, or to something that is already known about

As you can see, there is little difference between the meanings of the two words in this context. My preference would be for that. I would also expand the sentence a little, like this:

If a letter A is followed by one of the letters E, I or U, the A will be incorporated into that letter.

  • 'Followed by one of the letters E' sounds wrong to me. Shouldn't it be 'followed by the letter E, I or U' ? – user35072 Jun 15 '16 at 12:31
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This and that are used to refer to two things, and this used to talk about the one that is nearer, and that used to talk about a thing that is further away. So by using this or that you are implying that there are two groups of things, and one of them is near you and the other is far away from you.

The problem is with this:

If A is followed by E, I or U, the A will be incorporated into the/that letter.

The first problem with this is you initially present list of 3 letters without emphasizing that the letters are coherent group, so the that could the listener/reader off guard.

Obviously the only way to parse this into two groups in which we can label this or that is "A" and then "E, I, or U." Which is likely to be the way it is understood but unless someone was paying close attention they would be confused.

But do this and it's a bit clearer.

If A is followed by any of E, I, or U, the A will be incorporated into that letter.

  • 'Followed by any of E' sounds wrong to me. Shouldn't it be 'followed by the letter E, I or U' ? – user35072 Jun 15 '16 at 12:32

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