1

Which one is correct here?

  1. I am not working in this problem from yesterday onwards.

  2. I am not working in this problem since yesterday onwards.

1

I am not working in this problem from yesterday onwards.

I am not working in this problem since yesterday onwards.

Neither are correct as they stand - you have a mix of tenses

I am is only used in present and future tenses

working is an indicative progressive verb that can be used for past (I was working / I have been working, present I am working and future I will be working) tenses

in this problem We would normally expect on this problem or in this area

since yesterday puts this in the past

So, a correct alternative would be:

I have not been working on this problem since yesterday.

or

I have not worked on this problem since yesterday.

The second one would be my personal choice.

Note that the onwards is redundant - it doesn't really add anything and is probably a tautology.

Hope that helps

  • Three of us posting at once - that's not bad service :) – PerryW Jun 9 '16 at 1:58
0

As you have it written, with the current tense of "I am not working in" (which does not sound natural), I would probably choose "from". But, if I were to change the tense to something a little more natural, I would state:

I have not been working on this problem since yesterday onward.

In this case, the second feels better, though from would work as well. Personally though, I would use the simpler:

I have not worked on the problem since yesterday.

as the idea of "onward" is implied.

0

Neither is correct, in my opinion. There are a few issues. First, it should be on this problem, not in this problem. Also, the first clause has to be changed to present perfect continous, which you can read about here: http://www.englishgrammarsecrets.com/presentperfectcontinuous/menu.php

A correct sentence might be this:

I have not been working on this problem since yesterday onward.

You can omit the 's' at the end of onward.

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