1

I'm wondering how to use the verb fit. I found some examples on the internet. Sometimes a indirect object is used, sometimes it's not needed:

  • My clothes fit better now and people keep asking, "Are you losing weight?"

Also, different prepositions are used in these other examples.

  • Her elegant behaviour fit perfectly with the diplomatic corps.
  • These old boots are fit for the rubbish bin.
  • That table does not fit in the small room.
  • Even though you can't fit into any of your prepregnancy clothes, you still have your shoes, right?

But which of these phrases are correct?

1) Your clothes fit too tight to you and your appearance has changed before the mirror.
2) Your clothes fit you too tight and your appearance has changed before the mirror.
3) Your clothes fit too tight and your appearance has changed before the mirror.
4) Your clothes fit in you too tight and your appearance has changed before the mirror.
5) Your clothes fit into you too tight and your appearance has changed before the mirror.

The prepositions "in" and "into" look equivalent, and the rest have other different meanings. Is this right?

Is there some rules to make me more understandable all of this?

2

You are basically trying to express

Your clothes are too tight on you
your clothes are form fitting

You will want to use "tightly" (adverb) instead of "tight" in the constructions you have proposed.

In #4 and #5 using "in" and "into" does not make any sense since clothes are not "in" a person, but "on" a person.

#1 your clothes fit too tightly on you
#2 your clothes fit you too tightly
#3 your clothes fit too tightly

the three sentences are all equivalent in meaning. #3 is the shortest form, and each of these sentences implies the other with certain words left out.

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