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We promise your level up

We intended to use this expression to draw a particular crowd as an ads of an institute(or a cram school called "hakwon").

I'm asking this of you for a school assignment with my group in college. Sure, there's a lot of items for this. The problem is I think it's a wrong sentence, but all but me think it is good. So we planned to submit our assignment for that phrase. I posted this question for persuading my members lastly into using other units for a reasonable reason.

"We will bring your level up" or "we will get your level up" feels just fine. Even though I know this structure like "promise sth to sb" is possible, but I feel like "your level up" is not compatible with the verb "promise" as an object, because there are phrasal verbs like bring sth up or get sth up, but there isn't a thing like "promise sth up". And I googled the phrase "promise your level up" but 8 came out in search results. So I think it is wrong. What about you?

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    Don't you have somebody on your faculty who can answer this? If you don't, how can you suppose we would be comfortable helping you promote your school? – StoneyB Jun 13 '16 at 12:36
  • I'm doing this for a school assignment with my group in collage. Sure, there's a lot of items for this. The problem is I think it's a wrong sentence, but all but me think it is good. So we planned to submit our assignment for that phrase. I posted this question for persuading my members lastly into using other units for a reasonable reason. – anotherworld Jun 13 '16 at 12:43
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    Why do you think it's wrong. – Alan Carmack Jun 13 '16 at 13:01
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    "We will bring your level up" or "we will get your level up" feels just fine. Even though I know this structure like "promise sth to sb" is possible, but I feel like "your level up" is not compatible with the verb "promise" as an object, because there are phrasal verbs like bring sth up or get sth up, but there isn't a thing like "promise sth up". And I googled the phrase "promise your level up" but 8 came out in search results. So I think it is wrong. – anotherworld Jun 13 '16 at 13:12
  • Would you edit your question to include the information from your comments please? It would make it much easier for someone to write an answer that will be useful to you. – ColleenV Jun 13 '16 at 13:48
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You are correct; the sentence is wrong, and there are a number of problems with it. Yes, level up is an expression, but it's not being used correctly here.

Level up is a verb phrase. "Your" is only used with nouns or noun phrases: your level, your skills, your ability, etc. (I realize English can be confusing because so many words, like level, can function as nouns or verbs, but in this case it's a verb.) "Level up" just means something like "improve", so you can see how "your improve" doesn't make sense.

The normal structure used with promise is something like

  • We promise noun (for example, "We promise improvement")
  • We promise to verb (for example, "We promise to improve") or
  • We promise that clause (for example, "We promise that we will improve")

You can see how "your level up" doesn't match any of those. Possible alternatives that do work are

  • We promise to bring your level up
  • We promise that you will level up

Other problems with the sentence are that promise isn't really the right word to use in this context; in the context of promises made by a business to its customers, guarantee is a more idiomatic word choice.

Also, level up is a very slangy, informal choice of words, and is probably not appropriate for an ad, unless the entire ad is very informal, and "We promise" sounds relatively formal. "Bring your level up" is a better fit. (Note that level is a noun in this context!)

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