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I wrote,

In these systems, in a supervised manner, the user specifies the desired items on one or more example pages and the system automatically generates the extraction rules (the wrapper), and applies it to other web pages with a similar structure.

Should I or can I write it as:

In these systems, in a supervised manner, the user specifies the desired items on one or more example pages and the system automatically generates the extraction rules, the wrapper, and applies it to other web pages with a similar structure.

In these sentence the wrapper is a name for the same extraction rules (or the name for the output program).. also note I used it to refer to the wrapper, if I want to refer to extraction rules I must use "them", I don't know which should I refer grammatically or if using "it" is ok?!

Update: Also that's not the first definition of wrapper so that I can use "called wrapper", it is just an emphasis

By the way is it fluent to say (repeating in)

In these systems, in a supervised manner ...

  • You say "the wrapper is a name for the same extraction rules". If they are the same thing in fact, why try to differentiate which one it refers to? – user3169 Jun 13 '16 at 16:26
  • @user3169 yes I can refer to both, however I prefer to refer the wrapper. but since it is in parenthesis is asked if it is clear that it refers to it or not. – Ahmad Jun 13 '16 at 16:30
  • The sentence flows much better if you write "In these systems the user specifies, in a supervised manner, the desired..." – psmears Jun 13 '16 at 17:28
  • It is clear to me. – user3169 Jun 13 '16 at 17:33
  • 2
    You are making this sentence unnecessarily complicated in several ways, and punctuation won't help. 1. "in a supervised manner" is just hanging there and it is not clear how it integrates into the rest of the sentence. 2. Calling "rules" a "wrapper" seems odd; but if in your domain it is not odd to call rules a wrapper, you can make a new sentence. "These extraction rules are called the 'wrapper'." We can always make additional sentences; stuffing ancillary info into the nooks and crannies of a sentence reduces readability and clarity. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Jun 13 '16 at 19:25
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The explanatory term the wrapper does not need punctuation between it and the term it explains, when parenthesis are used. So:

In these systems, in a supervised manner, the user specifies the desired items on one or more example pages and the system automatically generates the extraction rules (the wrapper), and applies it to other web pages with a similar structure.

As for repeating "in", consider whether you need "In these systems" in context. My guess is that it is already understood. But if you need it, some separation might help.

In these systems, the user in a supervised manner specifies the desired items on one or more example pages and the system automatically generates the extraction rules (the wrapper), and applies it to other web pages with a similar structure.

  • Thanks the full context is Currently, there are visual tools that provide an interactive graphical user interface (GUI) for the user to create and execute a wrapper (e.g. Denodo, Kapowtech [10], Lixto [3] and Mozenda ). These systems are mainly designed to extract structured data such as a product or a service information from web pages. In these systems, in a supervised manner, the ... – Ahmad Jun 13 '16 at 15:58
  • And for separation I am afraid then the in a supervised manner refers to the way the user do the task, while I expect it be assigned to the whole process (involvement of the user) – Ahmad Jun 13 '16 at 15:59
  • By the way, I used it to refer to the wrapper, if I want to refer to extraction rules I must use "them", I don't know which should I refer or if using "it" is ok – Ahmad Jun 13 '16 at 16:08
  • I think in a supervised manner refers to the user actions in either case. If the "whole process" is different, more explanation identifying that is needed. – user3169 Jun 13 '16 at 16:18
  • what if I use in a supervised method? – Ahmad Jun 13 '16 at 16:26
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Commas can be used to include more details, just like you are trying to do. In this instance, I would recommend writing

the system automatically generates the extraction rules, called the wrapper, and applies...

If you would like to use use parentheses, that seems fine too. I believe that the parentheses should imply to your reader that the extraction rules are called the wrapper.

the system automatically generates the extraction rules (the wrapper) and applies

Again, for clarity, you might want to write (called the wrapper) if you want to use parentheses.

In these systems, in a supervised manner

seems fine, though you might want to clarify what "supervised manner" is in a separate sentence.

  • Thanks, By the way, I used it to refer to the wrapper, if I want to refer to extraction rules I must use "them", I don't know which should I refer or if using "it" is ok? – Ahmad Jun 13 '16 at 16:08
  • You should use it if you are referring to the wrapper and you believe it will be clear to the reader that you are referring to the wrapper. Also, I am assuming that in your context, the wrapper is singular. You should use them if you are referring to the extraction rules and you believe that it will be clear to the reader that you are referring to the extraction rules. – Em. Jun 13 '16 at 16:14
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You could choose to use either commas or parentheses, but if you do use parentheses don't use a comma before and after.

the system automatically generates the extraction rules (the wrapper) and applies it

And if you choose to use commas, it might be more clear if you clarify that the wrapper is the extraction rules by saying something like:

he system automatically generates the extraction rules, also called the wrapper, and applies

That would be my preferred sentence.

To address your second question the repeating in does sound pretty awkward. My primary instinct would be to just remove the "in a supervised manner" part, as I don't see what it really adds to the sentence. If the user is the one supervising then the user needing to specify other things seems to imply that they are supervising it.

However, you know your topic better than me, so if you feel it is necessary maybe consider something like

In these systems the user specifies the desired items in a supervised manner on one or more example pages and the system automatically generates the extraction rules,

or

In these systems the user, in a supervised manner, specifies the desired items on...

or some other rephrasing.

  • Thanks, in a supervised manner must refer to the whole process (the user involvement in the task) not the way the user do the task. I don't know if your alternatives convey this meaning – Ahmad Jun 13 '16 at 16:05
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Separating "the wrapper" with either a set of commas or parentheses is correct. If "the wrapper" is simply a name and does not add a specific description, I would probably stick with the parenthesis version. In this case, though, you will need to remove the comma following the parenthetical phrase. Also, you will need to add a comma after "example pages." Your two independent clauses are "user specifies" and "system generates and applies." You probably also want to change "it" to "them" since the pronoun is taking the place of the plural "extraction rules."

In these systems, in a supervised manner, the user specifies the desired items on one or more example pages, and the system automatically generates the extraction rules (the wrapper) and applies them to other web pages with a similar structure.

0

When I read the second version of the sentence,

… the system generates the extraction rules, the wrapper, and …

I feel as though I’m reading something like

… the customer buys the eggs, the milk, and …

In other words, lacking any sort of advance indication that you are introducing a singular term, wrapper, to refer to a group of things (the rules), your intended meaning is very obscure.  I strongly recommend that you use one of the suggestions involving the word “called”.  The first version (with the parentheses, but with no comma after he right parenthesis) would be my second choice.

Once you’ve successfully made the leap from the collective concept (the rules) to the singular term (“wrapper”), you should of course use the singular pronoun, “it”.

  • Its not the first definition of wrapper so that I can use called wrapper, it is just another emphasis – Ahmad Jun 14 '16 at 6:09
  • That information should be included in the question. – Scott Jun 14 '16 at 18:30

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