1

Which one is correct- Try it yourself or Try it for yourself.

If both are correct then please tell the scenario in which each should be used.

I am actually testing a website which contains one of those lines to Get Started with the site.

  • 1
    Why don't YOU tell US the scenario in which you wish to use it? – TrevorD Jun 13 '16 at 10:54
  • @TrevorD Because, er, s/he doesn't know what it means? And s/he's tried to explain the context that it what used in (though, not quite completely)? – Færd Jun 13 '16 at 11:26
3

Short answer: try it yourself and try it for yourself basically mean the same thing, which is You test it yourself.


The meaning of try in these sentences is

to use, test, or do (something new or different) in order to see if it is suitable, effective, or pleasant

Now, Suppose I've prepared a dish. I offer it to you and you ask "Does it taste good?". In this situation I can reply with "Try it yourself!", meaning: You test/taste it. Simple.
I also can reply with "Try it for yourself!" with the same meaning, maybe a little bit more emphatic: You should test it yourself or Why don't you taste it yourself?
It's sort of an idiom, in which the preposition for shouldn't be taken literally.

Here are a couple examples from COCA, where the contexts clearly show the meaning of try it for yourself:

  • In terms of deliberate strategies, both Teachers E and M advocated for the rule of trying something on your own before asking the teacher for help. Teacher E said, "When they ask me for help I say,'Well you have to try it for yourself first' ". Then from that, they will develop strategies as to how to go about solving a problem.
  • Those were reminiscences of just two days out of 75 we spent in Europe. That is what I am trying to say about bicycle touring. It is a magical mode of transportation. Wondrous things happen when you are touring by bike. If you don't believe me, try it for yourself.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.