1
  1. The name of the team became a symbol of a fast and furious play

  2. The name of the team has become a symbol of a fast and furious play

Is any of these two sentences wrong? When doing a test I answered "became" but my teacher said that's wrong and I should say has become. I doubt that and I personally would say that both answers are correct.

  • 1
    Was there any other context, or did the exercise merely present these words with a blank to be filled with either "became" or "has become"? – David K Jun 11 '16 at 23:34
  • The exercise was presented only with these words. – Bob Jun 11 '16 at 23:46
1

Present perfect simple --- has become --- is used here because the consequences of past actions are important in the present.

For example - I've lost my phone. (the result is that I cannot call anyone)

I lost my phone yesterday. I was worried. (There is no consequence because I found it later)

Go here for a detailed study.

  • 1
    Aside from the fact that it's odd that losing your keys results in your not being able to call anyone, I lost a fortune in the market yesterday would seem to have consequences important in the present, at least for most people. – deadrat Jun 12 '16 at 1:17
  • @deadrat Thanks. I edited the mistake. Also, good point. – vickyace Jun 12 '16 at 1:19
  • I think there's not enough context to decide. We may be talking about a team which is active now, or which was active some years ago but is now defunct, in which case past simple would be appropriate. – Sydney Jul 15 '16 at 13:06
1

It depends. #1 is correct if you're saying that a particular incident caused the name to become a symbol of a fast and furious play. #2 is correct if the team's history over time caused the name to become a symbol of a fast and furious play.

-1

“Became” is when it happened in the past only!

Ex 1: “I lost in the market” true has serious consequences in the present, but the “losing” process has stopped in the past!

Ex 2: “the name of the team became a symbol of a fast and furious play” means it once became a symbol in the past but is not a symbol of a fast and furious play anymore. “the name of the team has become a symbol of a fast and furious play” means in the past it became a symbol and it’s still a symbol. If the teacher said you should say “has become” it’s because symbols of something often are for good, once they’re a symbol of something, they can’t stop being that (except maybe in very rare cases or so, in which you use became instead of has become, depending on the context)

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy