1

What does the below sentence mean?:

"I don't love one human being more than another human being"

Does the above sentence mean:

1: "I don't love one human being more than how much I love another human being."
OR
2: "I don't love one human being more than how much another human being loves the one."

I find English to be a confusing sometimes... help will be appreciated.

0

Option 1 would be most correct.

You can also read the sentence as:

"I don't love any human being more than another human being"

The "one" is just to emphasise that one single person is never worth more or less than one other single person, at least according to the person who wrote the sentence. Don't get confused with the "one" and just think of it as "any".

2
  • I got confused because for example, a sentence "I love you more than him" can be interpreted as either "I love you more than how much I love him" or "I love you more than how much he loves you" (can't it be)? so technically speaking, wouldn't my original sentence be interpreted in either way? – dweins Jun 16 '16 at 13:44
  • In the example in your comment, you have two options because there are two people (besides yourself): you and him. As such the subject of the sentence is ambiguous. However, you know who you and him are, so it's possible you're talking about something personal such as loving you more than **him. So yes, that's correct. In your original question I suppose it's also true, but because the subjects are just unspecified people, it's most likely option 1. It's unlikely to be option 2 because we don't know who the two "human beings" are. It's difficult to understand :) – Daniel Porteous Jun 16 '16 at 13:49

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