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A phrase from a package insert:

A similar effect may arise due to the poor general health of the patient, as well as due to seriously compromised liver or kidney function (see also section “Special warnings and precautions for use”)

Is it okay as it is, or should one use the here?

A similar effect may arise due to the poor general health of the patient, as well as due to seriously compromised liver or kidney function (see also the section “Special warnings and precautions for use”)

Does the "headlinese-style omission of articles" apply to parenthetical constructions?

  • It's not a headline it's an instruction. As in bring water to boil and add egg. Or perhaps it just wonky English. Who wrote it? The same people who write fortune cookie inserts? – Alan Carmack Jun 18 '16 at 5:52
  • @AlanCarmack - so the-dropping is okay? – CowperKettle Jun 18 '16 at 5:53
  • @AlanCarmack - I am the proud author of this sentence. Trying my hand at translation. – CowperKettle Jun 18 '16 at 5:58
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    If "Special warnings and precautions for use” is a link to a different webpage (or section title in a typed paper) you don't need to use section before it. Just say See "Special warnings and precautions for use”, and ditch the quotation marks if it is a link. – Alan Carmack Jun 18 '16 at 6:12
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    A case can be made for either using the or not using the. We often use something like See Section IX.Ib.32c, and using the would not be my advice in this case. So one can transfer that line of reasoning to your sections, which happen to have text, not numerics. Or you could justify nonuse of the along the lines I already mentioned, viz a recipe instruction, or from note-taking English. – Alan Carmack Jun 18 '16 at 6:23
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Typically we say "See section {section-identifier}".

for example

See section §4.3.2

The phrase "Special warnings and precautions for use” is being used as an identifier.

You could also write:

See "Special warnings and precautions for use”

or

See the section entitled "Special warnings and precautions for use”

With an identifier, you would not use the definite article.

See page 23.

See chapter 17.

See the chapter on Boiler Repair.

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