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In most cases it is possible to avoid a severe systemic reaction as a result of accidental vascular injection through the use of an injection technique in which aspiration is followed by a slow injection of 0.2-0.4 ml of the drug, which is followed by a slow injection of the remaining volume after a delay of at least 10 seconds.

Should one use the indefinite article here? Or is it better without one?

In most cases it is possible to avoid a severe systemic reaction as a result of accidental vascular injection through the use of an injection technique in which aspiration is followed by slow injection of 0.2-0.4 ml of the drug, which is followed by slow injection of the remaining volume after a delay of at least 10 seconds.

I believe it's better with the indefinite article because there is an "of-phrase".

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    It's fine. It is meant to draw attention to slow, distinguishing the method from "a rapid injection" and "a normal injection". Semantically you're converting the noun injection into a process, a verb,and thus are wanting to parse slow as an adverb. Just a guess. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Jun 18 '16 at 12:53
  • These questions are bordering on (or are actually) proofreading. It's similar to "which adjective is better here?" You could also use the. It seems you'll have to get exposure to skads more English for a better grasp of article usage. Telling us why you think it should be a might steer it away from being proofreading. – Alan Carmack Jun 18 '16 at 15:36
  • @AlanCarmack - I was attending translation courses at a university, and teachers with 20 to 30 years of experience there make article errors now and then. It's not something you ever perfectly grasp when your native language lacks the very concept. I'll try to provide some reasoning behind the use of "a". – CowperKettle Jun 18 '16 at 15:53
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    @AlanCarmack: SE does not care whether someone is making money indirectly off what they learn here, or even directly. If it did, SO would be pointless. The proofreading close reason is for cases that are too specific to be useful to anyone else and too broad to cover in any reasonable detail, resulting in useless answers that teach no one anything at all. Here, teaching is perfectly possible and there is no sense in which that close reason can apply. – Nathan Tuggy Jul 30 '16 at 6:24
  • For archival purposes, some this conversation has been moved to chat. – J.R. Jul 30 '16 at 22:19
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An indefinite (or definite) article is definitely called for here. "Injection" is a noun in this scenario, and "slow" is an adjective. Because "slow injection" is not a process in and of itself, it requires an article to specify whether this is a generic injection or a specific injection. @Peter 's answer brought up the point of "intramuscular injection," but this is different from "slow injection." "Intramuscular" could be a normal descriptive adjective (saying that this specific injection is into the muscles), or it could be a descriptive adjective that is inherent to the process (all injections of this type are required to be into the muscles). Because "intramuscular injection" has this dual property, it can be used without an article, whereas "slow injection" ("slow" is only a normal descriptive in this case) does not and thus requires an article of some sort. The indefinite article does make sense, but so would a definite article.

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  • But then, all injections of this type could (in theory) be called "slow injections" right? Pretend there is a process called "slow injection" with specific action steps. Then, no article. – user3169 Jul 31 '16 at 5:39
  • @user3169 That could be true. But, "slow injection" has not been defined by context, so we have to go with it just being an "injection" that is "slow." – Sam K Aug 1 '16 at 0:43
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Without the article, your usage of

slow injection

sounds like a formal technique, similar to

intramuscular injection
subcutaneous injection

whereas you probably mean

slowly injecting

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