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In the above sentence Vijay Mallya is declaring any other person as an offender or vijay malya is declared as an offender I didn't understand and please can anybody explain me clearly and some suggestions on how to improve my readabality.

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  • Is that exactly what the text said? Are you sure you copied correctly?
    – Em.
    Jun 19, 2016 at 11:37
  • Hi @probablyme this is exact "Vijay Mallya, declared a proclaimed offender in a money laundering case, on Sunday said he was not a “gate crasher” since we cannot post more than 150 characters in question dialog box thats why I reduced and this sentenced I saw In THE HINDU
    – CSiva
    Jun 19, 2016 at 11:40
  • I see. No, that is not the "question dialog", it is for the title. You can add many, or better yet, all the details in the main body of the post. Yes, you have to keep the title brief, but add all the details in the body. This will prevent some confusion.
    – Em.
    Jun 19, 2016 at 11:49
  • Headline from The Hindu, June 14: Court declares Mallya a proclaimed offender. Obviously "proclaimed offender" is a two-word noun with some special legal significance. In fact, the text of that article continues with A person is termed a proclaimed offender in a criminal investigation if the court believes that the accused has absconded or is concealing himself so that a warrant cannot be executed. The court has classified Mallya as one of those - that's all there is to it. Jun 19, 2016 at 11:50
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    It's important to note that the cited text in the question is not a "sentence" - it's just a noun phrase. My Jo Cox example above is a complete sentence, since it contains the "verb" component was murdered. Jun 19, 2016 at 14:20

1 Answer 1

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Note this headline from The Hindu, June 14...

Court declares Mallya a proclaimed offender

Although I'd never heard of a "proclaimed offender" before, the context of that headline makes it obvious it's a two-word noun with some special legal significance. In fact, the text of that article continues with...

A person is termed a "proclaimed offender" in a criminal investigation if the court believes that the accused has absconded or is concealing himself so that a warrant cannot be executed.

...where I've added the quote marks and highlighting for clarity. Bear in mind that the verbs to declare and to proclaim are effectively synonyms, and it's really a matter of chance that the Indian legal system chose to use "proclaimed offender" rather than "declared offender" for their purpose. If they'd chosen the other term, the headline might easily have been...

Court proclaims [that] Mallya [is] a declared offender

...which is syntactically just as valid, but doesn't use the established legal terminology.


Also note that Vijay Mallya, declared a proclaimed offender in a money laundering case is a noun phrase (a potential subject, but with no functional verb). It's not a complete sentence - that would be something like...

Mallya, a proclaimed offender, insists [that] he is innocent.

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