-1

Source at 1:41

This seems not to be a sentence.How should we interpret it?

Edit: Just another example
Source at 1:08

Ther's such a difference between us and a million miles.

And seems to be acting like which is.Does not it?

closed as unclear what you're asking by Alan Carmack, FumbleFingers, ColleenV, user3169, Brian Tompsett - 汤莱恩 Jun 21 '16 at 19:20

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  • It's not meant to be a sentence It's an adverbial phrase. Quarter tank refers to the amount or level of gasoline/petrol in a motor vehicle's gas tank (American English); it can also refer to the amount of food in a person's stomach. – Alan Carmack Jun 21 '16 at 14:29
1

I understand it as a metaphor for a vanishing love, exhausting the fuel of passion. Put some verses together:

  1. "You brought the fire to a world so cold": beginning of the story, the tank is full of passion, enough to set the world on fire.
  2. "With half the tank and empty heart": after a while, half of the fuel is burnt, the relationship is going out, see the play on "half-empty tank" and "empty heart"
  3. "A quarter tank is almost gone": the end is approaching
  4. "We're out of time on the highway to never": the end of the road

A form of poetry.

  • 'And' acts like 'which is'. – Anubhav Singh Jun 21 '16 at 14:42
  • I am not fully sure. In some contexts I understand it as "but". No more love, but something remains – Laurent Duval Jun 21 '16 at 14:53

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