2

We have in Polish this very generic term "być w delegacji", literally translated as "to be in a delegation". It is usually translated by dictionaries as a "business trip", however it does not have a nuance of the trip being part of a commercial activity—it might be used by both a for-profit and government/not-for-profit trips.

Can "business trip" be used for a non-commercial, non-entertainment trip? Or maybe there is a more general phrase do describe a job-related trip with no subtext of being money-related?

  • 3
    A politician might attend a conference on climate change, for example. From his (and his family's) point of view it's a business trip, because he's there to work as part of his designated occupation ("business" doesn't always have to be about commercial activity / profit). – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica Jun 30 '16 at 14:17
  • @FumbleFingers: that's pretty much a full answer to my question. Could you add it below? – liori Jun 30 '16 at 14:36
  • We also have on business (I am here on business) and on official business (The senator was there on official business). – Tᴚoɯɐuo Jun 30 '16 at 16:15
3

A politician might attend a conference on climate change, for example. From his (and his family's) point of view it's a business trip, because he's there to work as part of his designated occupation ("business" doesn't always have to be about commercial activity / profit).

In the context of something like a trip, the key distinction is business or pleasure, not whether the primary purpose is profit-oriented.

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.