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This study compares the immunotoxic effects of repeated administration of two monoclonal antibodies, the ABC-12 (RusBio, lot #1023) and Herceptin (Hoffmann-La Roche, Switzerland), to rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

Do I need the definite article here?

I'm tempted to use it because I feel an elision of the words "monoclonal antibody", that is, "the ABC-12 monoclonal antibody".

But since it's a proper noun, maybe the version without "the" would be more proper.

This study compares the immunotoxic effects of repeated administration of two monoclonal antibodies, ABC-12 (RusBio, lot #1023) and Herceptin (Hoffmann-La Roche, Switzerland), to rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

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    Ditch it, it's not required. There's only one kind of ABC-12 .... so the article "the" is not required to mark the NP as definite. Note btw, that the appositive NP in your example is more specifically a 'supplementary' (non-defining) appositive, not a modifier. – BillJ Jul 3 '16 at 11:31
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This is analogous to the question about (the) Minkowski spaces of the other day.

I don't know anything about the drugs mentioned, but I assume from its alphanumeric designation that ABC-12 is experimental and from its brand name that Herceptin is a commercially established drug.

Something new to the scene and lacking a proper "proper name" might use "the", which would corroborate its novelty, its not-yet-established state, and something well established, with a proper proper name, like Herceptin, would tend not to have "the".

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The determinant "the" is not necessary.

If you do use it, you may want to think about also placing a "the" in front of "Herceptin" to keep parallel construction.

This study compares the immunotoxic effects of repeated administration of two monoclonal antibodies, the ABC-12 (RusBio, lot #1023) and the Herceptin (Hoffmann-La Roche, Switzerland), to rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

however using two "the"s sounds awkward. You could explicitly enumerate your list of two using "1)" and "2)".

You might reformulate your sentence as

This study compares the immunotoxic effects of repeated administration of two monoclonal antibodies to rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta): ABC-12 (RusBio, lot #1023) and Herceptin (Hoffmann-La Roche, Switzerland).

so the monkeys aren't hanging off the end of the sentence.

I don't think there is a "-" in ABC12.

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