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  1. There will always be some people out there HATE YOU.
  2. There will always be some people out there TO HATE YOU.
  3. There will always be some people out there WHO HATE YOU.
  4. There will always be some people out there WHO HATES YOU.

Which one is grammatically acceptable?

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    Third one sounds good. Two is fine, too. – NVZ Jul 4 '16 at 18:35
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Number 3 is normal in all varieties of English, as far as I know.

Number 2 is grammatical, but has a different meaning: it implies that those people exist for the purpose of hating you, which sounds rather unlikely.

Number 4 is ungrammatical: 'who' refers to 'people', which is plural.

Number 1 is ungrammatical in my English, but is used in some dialects - typically some American ones, I think. In standard English, relative pronouns can be omitted if they are the object of the relative clause, but not if they are the subject.

Another possibility is

There will always be some people out there that hate you.

This is no different in meaning from number 3.

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  • The fact that you shouldn't use "that" to refer to people doesn't stop most people from doing it. It annoys me, but I accept that people will use it no matter how I feel about it. – A. McCurran Jul 4 '16 at 22:27
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    @A.McCurran: I am vaguely aware that some people have promulgated such a rule. I have no interest in such a rule, or acknowledging their authority. – Colin Fine Jul 5 '16 at 9:26
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    +1 I think that the rule is more helpfully stated: "In standard English, relative pronouns can be omitted (from restrictive relative clauses) if they are not the subject of the relative clause". This is because they can be omitted if they are objects of prepositions or subjects of embedded clauses within the relative clause. – Araucaria - Not here any more. Jul 5 '16 at 13:38
  • @Araucaria: Yes, I agree. – Colin Fine Jul 5 '16 at 15:24

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