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Can:

"Not everyone can love you"

be used to mean:

"It's impossible for you to be loved by everyone: there will always be some people out there who hate you" ?

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    Not everyone on this forum will give you an answer. – user24743 Jul 4 '16 at 17:43
  • @Rathony What do you mean by saying "Not everyone on this forum will give you an answer."? 1. Do you mean that there will be no one answering my question? OR 2. Do you mean that there will be someone/some people (on this forum) answering my question (but not all of them)? – Lucas Gabriel Jul 4 '16 at 17:55
  • The many people who don't know you neither love nor hate you. However 'You can't expect everybody to love/like you' is quite common, and usually taken to mean '... everybody who knows you ...'. – Edwin Ashworth Jul 4 '16 at 18:27
  • @EdwinAshworth Thank you. But, are these sentences -----> "Not everyone on this world can love you", "not everyone on this world can be your friend", "not every student in your school can give you advice" grammatically acceptable? – Lucas Gabriel Jul 4 '16 at 18:34
  • Certainly. Have you tried Googling these? However, on semantic grounds, I'd prefer "Don't expect everyone to love/like you [: there will always be some people who hate you]" to "It's impossible for you to be loved by everyone: there will always be some people who hate you". – Edwin Ashworth Jul 4 '16 at 18:43
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The two sentences mostly mean the same thing. The second one is much stronger though, using "impossible".

Instead of the first sentence, it is more usual to say:

You can't satisfy everybody.

at the "cost" of being broader.

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