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Yesterday, he sent me a few of the books he's written.

Yesterday, he sent me a few of the books he wrote.

Yesterday, he sent me a few of the books he'd written.

What's the difference between these three sentences meaning wise? It's pretty obvious that he wrote the book before he sent them to me yesterday, so do we really need to use the unnecessary past perfect?

I'm actually more concerned about first one and second one and what differences they have meaning wise.

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As mentioned, it’s the context that matters. Contrast:

Q: Do you know if Ralph knows how to make bird houses?
A: Yes, just yesterday he showed me several of the bird houses he has made
Q: Did Ralph make bird houses when he was younger?
A: Yes, just yesterday he showed me several bird houses he had made.
A: Yes, just yesterday he showed me several bird house he made when he was a boy.

The distinction between #2 and #3 is not very great, since they both suggest the idea that Ralph's bird-house-making days are over. Number 1, however, conveys the idea that Ralph might very well make another bird house tomorrow.

Unsolicited advice: Avoid tacking "-wise" on the end of words to create adverbs. They can get unwieldy:

Q: Is Ralph a good carpenter?
A: Well, I wouldn't ask him to build a house, but he's OK bird house wise.

  • sorry for the downvote, it's by mistake. I'll rectify it when SE lets me – Some_Guy Sep 9 '16 at 22:34

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