0
  1. To my mind, celebration is good to have, but I do not encourage spending too much money.
  2. To my mind, to have celebration is good, but I do not encourage spending too much money.

Are the two sentences both grammatically correct? Or which one is better and why?

3
  • I'm not exactly sure what you're trying to say. What do you mean by "celebration"? Are we talking about a party to promote, say, recent success at work? And you're saying that the cost of this celebration can't be too high? Or do you mean that in general, it's a good thing to go out with friends and have a good time, but it shouldn't consume too much of your budget? Or perhaps something else? It's hard to answer you without knowing what you intend to say.
    – WendiKidd
    Commented Aug 30, 2013 at 3:18
  • I mean birthday or wedding celebrations, and I want to express it is better not to make it too expensive.
    – canoe
    Commented Aug 30, 2013 at 3:26
  • I think the usual idiom is in my mind, not to my mind. I'd just say, "Celebration is good, but don't spend too much."
    – J.R.
    Commented Nov 3, 2014 at 20:43

2 Answers 2

1

I'd rephrase a bit to something like this:

In my opinion, it's important to celebrate momentous occasions. I do not encourage spending too much money on the party, though. (It's the celebration that's important, not having expensive things.)

You could also tailor it to the specific occasion:

In my opinion, it's important to celebrate birthdays. I do not encourage spending too much money on the party, though.

1

Not sure about grammatical correctness, but I would not use either in common speech. I would use celebrate as a verb rather than celebration as a noun. So I'd say "to my mind, celebrating is good..." or more likely "to my mind, it's good to celebrate". Or if you really wanted to use a noun, then "to my mind, it's good to have a celebration..."

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .