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This is what my friend asked me and he gave out the following examples:

  1. Facebook's new feature translates your post into different languages depending on who's reading it.

  2. Depending on what Duncan decides, Pau Gasol could be the answer for the Spurs.

  3. Kremlin: Russia will ease sanctions on Turkey depending on talks outcome

Now I know that you are supposed to use the present participle form here, any other form just sound strange, but the thing is, I don't know how to explain the word placement, because that phrase is so commonly used, we sort of using it without questioning its property. So is the phrase depending on modify and if it modify a whole sentence, what should we called it and why must it be in the present participle form, grammatically speaking of course.

And correct me if I'm wrong but on the following phrase:

If viewed from the distance, the mountain is beautiful.

The subject of the first clause is also mountain, right?

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I think participial phrases that look like they modify the entire sentence really modify the verb in that sentence, making them "adverbial participial phrases" instead of "adjectival participial phrases"

Facebook's new feature translates your post into different languages depending on who's reading it.

Depending on who's reading it modifies translates. Because you can rewrite it like this and it will still make sense.

Facebook's new feature translates, depending on who's reading it, your post into different languages.

Single-word adverbs in sentences are typically moveable in the sentence like that too.

The two politicians debated the topics hotly.

The two politicians hotly debated the topics.


If viewed from the distance, the mountain is beautiful.

First, if viewed from the distance does not have a subject, so it's not a clause, it's a phrase. Clauses have subjects and verbs.

Viewed is the past-participle form of view, so it's an "adverbial past participial phrase" which modifies is, conditionally due to the if.

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At first i thought that about depending on too but the sentence" Depending on what Duncan decides, Pau Gasol could be the answer for the Spurs" confuses me because i can't really identify the word that "depending on" modifies.Beside from all the book and document that i did my research on participle phrases stick to modify noun only and prepositional phrases did the same to verb.Let's take based on and on the basis of in the following example : a/The document were sent based on your suggestion

b/The document was sent on the basis of your suggestion

So are there any other kinds of phrase out there? The closest to the modifying the whole sentence i got are those absolute phrases, but they start with a noun instead of a participle.

Also, is "If it is viewed from a distance, the mountain is beautiful" the same as the mentioned example? Best regard

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These are adverbial clauses with "depending on", just remember that "on" is a preposition here and it must have a noun, gerund, or noun clause. In all three of your examples, this is the case: noun clause, noun clause, and noun ("talks").

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