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Source

The Washington Post carefully curated a nine-course meal to document the occasion including newspaper chilaquiles, dumplings, falafel, steaks, the way Trump likes them, and even a Trump Tower-inspired taco bowl.

The bold part is not a dish.Then why it is put there?

Edit:The source from where I read it says exactly the same.It wasn't my fault.

  • I'm leaving this closed, because it appears that this quote wasn't copied correctly from the article. It should read 'The Washington Post carefully curated a nine-course meal to document the occasion including newspaper chilaquiles, dumplings, falafel, steaks ("well-done" the way Trump likes them), and even a Trump Tower-inspired taco bowl.' The punctuation and extra words make the meaning clear. – ColleenV parted ways Jul 10 '16 at 12:00
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    You should include your source to confirm the comment above. In fact, I will remind you to always include sources whenever possible. – Em. Jul 10 '16 at 13:53
  • Put it there, I wasn't wrong in asking that question. – Anubhav Singh Jul 10 '16 at 15:15
  • Which is why you should always cite your source. The main problem is that the sentence is poorly punctuated. It should be falafel, steaks (the way Trump likes them), and even.... Leaving out "well-done" was a bad choice in my opinion because it leaves readers wondering "How does Trump like them?" but it wouldn't make it harder to understand if the punctuation were correct. – ColleenV parted ways Jul 10 '16 at 20:15
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steaks, the way Trump likes them...

You're right, "the way Trump likes them" is not a dish, but it is an explanatory phrase to clarify something else. The author is specifying that the steaks were prepared in the manner that Trump likes them. (I don't think this is an example of very good writing, by the way. It would have been much clearer if the author had written something like "steaks prepared the way Trump likes them".)

With some of the ink "mercifully well-ground" into the steak's chimichurri sauce

Ground is the correct word here, not grounded. This is the past participle of to grind: Today I grind the spices, yesterday I ground the spices. (Grounded would only be correct if the verb were to ground.) Again, this does not seem like the best writing to me - ink and chimichurri are both usually liquids, so I don't understand how you would "grind" ink into chimichurri (grinding is something you do to solids) but the meaning is clear enough: it is thoroughly and completely mixed in.

To wash it all down

"It" just refers to the food. To wash something down is an idiom that means "to have drink with your food"; to me it implies that there is a lot of food, so you would need to help it down with some liquid.

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