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I see this sentence is an English textbook:

I think this is the most desirable of the compact cars

But I can't understand it easily, maybe I can't understand the part "most desirable of", especially the "of" here.

I have a guess:

Maybe I'm a car seller, and there are many kinds of cars, including compact ones and bigger ones. I'm introducing some cars to customers, and I can use this sentence to let them know they should buy the compact cars I'm introducing.

Is that a good situation to use this sentence?

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    Out of the set consisting of compact cars, this (one) is the most desirable. – Alan Carmack Jul 10 '16 at 8:13
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That sentence seems fairly natural to me. Here are a few ways I can rephrase it that might help you.

  1. Regarding the compact cars, I think this is the most desirable.
  2. Speaking about the compact cars, I think this is the most desirable.
  3. Among the compact cars, I think this is the most desirable.

So in other words, there is a group of compact cars. There is one in particular, "this" one and you think this one is the most desirable.

There many reasons that it could be desirable. Maybe it has great navigation features, or excellent gas mileage, or whatever. That is why you think it want it more than the other compact cars.

Yes, this could be a sentence that a car seller might say. But I can also imagine a customer saying this. For example, a husband and wife are talking about buy a compact car, possibly at the dealership. The husband or wife is looking at all the features and thinks "this one" is very appealing. He or she might say

I think this is the most desirable of the compact cars

to the other one.

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